Nintendo Reveals Limited Number Of Joy-Cons Impacted By Manufacturing Variation

Ever since launch, some people have experienced varying degrees of synch issues with their Joy-Con controllers for the Nintendo Switch. The most common problem seems to be from the left Joy-Con losing connection. Kotaku has reached out to Nintendo about the situation, and received a reply detailing that there was a small manufacturing variation with a small number of left Joy-Con controllers. That issue has since been remedied at the factory, but if you are experiencing issues you should contact them and the customer service representative will determine if a repair is necessary. The statement from Nintendo reads:

 

There is no design issue with the Joy-Con controllers, and no widespread proactive repair or replacement effort is underway. A manufacturing variation has resulted in wireless interference with a small number of the left Joy-Con. Moving forward this will not be an issue, as the manufacturing variation has been addressed and corrected at the factory level.

We have determined a simple fix can be made to any affected Joy-Con to improve connectivity.

There are other reasons consumers may be experiencing wireless interference. We are asking consumers to contact our customer support team so we can help them determine if a repair is necessary. If it is, consumers can send their controller directly to Nintendo for the adjustment, free of charge, with an anticipated quick return of less than a week. Repair timing may vary by region. For help with any hardware or software questions, please visit http://support.nintendo.com.

 

If you want to speak to someone at Nintendo, give them a call at: 1-800-255-3700. It’s great to hear the problem isn’t widespread (none of us here have had any issues so far), but if you’re one of the unlucky ones, Nintendo should get you all fixed up in no time.

 

[Source: Kotaku]

 

Craig Majaski

Craig has been covering the video game industry since 1995. His work has been published across a wide spectrum of media sites. He's currently the Editor-In-Chief of Nintendo Times and contributes to Gaming Age.

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