Nintendo Shares Top Tokyo Trading In Fiscal 2016

For fiscal year 2016, Nintendo’s stock generated the highest turnover in Japan. It jumped to over four times its original amount to 17.6 trillion yen ($157 billion), making Nintendo the top of Nikkei’s charts for the first time since data has been shared in the last 20 years. Coming in behind Nintendo was Toyota at 13.9 trillion yen and Mitsubishi Financial Group at 13.2 trillion yen.

As one looks back at the last year, several important events occurred that led to such a huge amount of trading of Nintendo stock. The first big wave came in July with the release of Pokémon Go on mobile devices. In fact, on July 20, 2016 Nintendo’s trading value hit 732.3 billion yen, the highest one-day total ever recorded for a Tokyo stock. As the year progressed, the Pokémon phenomenon continued with the Sun & Moon and the 3DS and 2DS was virtually out of stock for months as demand outstripped supply.

 

 

Then, last month Nintendo launched its Nintendo Switch console and it has been an amazing success. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is one of the highest rated games of all time, and is helping propel the Switch’s sales even a month after launch. It’s the system’s killer app, and it doesn’t hurt that the marketing around the new system has been on-point. Customers immediately understand the appeal of taking console games on the go, and the messaging seems to be resonating with gamers across the world.

 

 

Will fiscal year 2017 be as fortunate for Nintendo? Only time will tell, but it does have some hot-hitters in the pipeline. If they can maintain the Switch sales momentum, perhaps they will continue to see this type of success in the months to come.

 

[Source: Nikkei Asian Review]

Craig Majaski

Craig has been covering the video game industry since 1995. His work has been published across a wide spectrum of media sites. He's currently the Editor-In-Chief of Nintendo Times and contributes to Gaming Age.

Join The Conversation!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: